WATER | NH Photographer Blog Party

August 21, 2012  •  1 Comment

I am new to a group of New Hampshire photographers that work together on a blog project.  This month's blog theme is "water". You can see the interpretations by other NH photographers and follow the entire project by clicking the links at the bottom of each post.
 

Water. I choose to live by the water. In the summers I appreciate the light change over the water throughout the day: from soft, morning yellow, to evening blue, to midnight moonlight.  Water reflects the colors of the sky, and distorts reality in really interesting ways. Kayaking with my camera is my favorite way to nurture myself physically, spiritually, and creatively.

A highlight of being out on the water is the prospect of a loon surfacing near me. Being in the presence of a loon always feels like a gift.  Because I do not have a long lens, if I am able to create an image of a loon it is because it has chosen to reveal itself to me "wicked" close!

One night early this month I was out on the lake and I was able to spend some quality time with our resident pair with chick, as well as with a rogue loon. The  latter was much more more concerned with its bath than with me, and I am pleased with the quirkiness of these images!




Too much water. While getting out of my boat, psyched about my encounter and my images, I didn't notice the motor boat that was surprisingly close to shore. I got "waked". My camera got "waked", too.

I did not take a deep breath the entire time my camera was in the oven for more than three days.
I did not want to go out on the lake, or actually see, anything. I felt cut-off, anxious.  The world was still there, but I didn't have my way to connect to it.  Creating images is more than clicking a shutter. It is a process of perceiving and then expressing vision.  For me, creating is the process of connecting.

My story has a happy ending, at least to date.  Here is how I de-humidified my camera.

When your camera gets drenched |How to dry out a Canon DSLR

Remove lens, both batteries, and memory card
Open all orifices
Place camera in brown paper bag, fold over the top
Place in warm oven on "low" (not over 120 degrees)
Have faith
Fend off real cooks
Leave in oven for several days... all the hours you are at home and awake... until camera is fully functional.

I've been back out on the water as usual, camera in my lap, ready at an impulse.


Check out Carey's  "water" images at Carey Hough Photography


Comments

Kristen(non-registered)
Informative and lovely....thank you for this post!
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